5 Jul 2020, 4:38am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “Revise the Psalm: work celebrating the writing of Gwendolyn Brooks” by Quraysh Ali Lansana and Sandra Jackson-Opoku

Kate’s 2¢: “Revise the Psalm: work celebrating the writing of Gwendolyn Brooks” by Quraysh Ali Lansana and Sandra Jackson-Opoku

“Revise the Psalm: work celebrating the writing of Gwendolyn Brooks” by Quraysh Ali Lansana and Sandra Jackson-Opoku

Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

Brooks writes about her Black culture from various aspects and facets of her time.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks was born on June 7, 1917, in Topeka, Kansas.[2] She was the first child of David Anderson Brooks and Keziah (Wims) Brooks. Her father, a janitor for a music company, had hoped to pursue a career as a doctor but sacrificed that aspiration to get married and raise a family. Her mother was a school teacher as well as a concert pianist trained in classical music. Brooks’ mother had taught at the Topeka school that later became involved in the famous Brown v. Board of Education racial desegregation case.[7] Family lore held that Brooks’ paternal grandfather had escaped slavery to join the Union forces during the American Civil War.[8]
When Brooks was six weeks old, her family moved to Chicago during the Great Migration, and from then on, Chicago remained her home. She would closely identify with Chicago for the rest of her life. In a 1994 interview, she remarked,
Living in the city, I wrote differently than I would have if I had been raised in Topeka, KS … I am an organic Chicagoan. Living there has given me a multiplicity of characters to aspire for. I hope to live there the rest of my days. That’s my headquarters.[9]
She started her formal education at Forestville Elementary School on Chicago’s South Side.[10] Brooks then attended a prestigious integrated high school in the city with a predominantly white student body, Hyde Park High School; transferred to the all-black Wendell Phillips High School; and finished her schooling at integrated Englewood High School.[11]
According to biographer Kenny Jackson Williams, due to the social dynamics of the various schools, in conjunction with the era in which she attended them, Brooks faced much racial injustice. Over time, this experience helped her understand the prejudice and bias in established systems and dominant institutions, not only in her own surroundings but in every relevant American mindset.[11]
Brooks began writing at an early age and her mother encouraged her, saying, “You are going to be the lady Paul Laurence Dunbar.”[12] During her teenage years, she began submitting poems to various publications. By the time she had graduated from high school in 1935, she was already a regular contributor to The Chicago Defender.[10]
Brooks died December 3, 2000 (aged 83 in Chicago, Illinois.)
From NLS/BARD/LOC:
Revise the Psalm: work celebrating the writing of Gwendolyn Brooks DB87896
Lansana, Quraysh Ali; Jackson-Opoku, Sandra. Reading time: 11 hours, 6 minutes.
Read by Mary Kane. A production of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.

Poetry

A collection of over one hundred poems, essays, and short stories, all celebrating the life, writings, and activism of Gwendolyn Brooks. Themes explore the everyday experiences of black Americans. Some violence, some strong language, and some descriptions of sex. 2017.

4 Jul 2020, 7:27am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Cornucopia: aromaticapoetica.

Cornucopia: aromaticapoetica.

I’m always happy, surprised, and delighted when someone else enjoys the pieces I write.

“The Smells of Home” * Memoir * Kate Chamberlin


https://www.aromaticapoetica.com/2020/07/02/“Eating -Up-History-in-Colonial-Williamsburg-Essay-Kate-Chamberlin/

30 Jun 2020, 6:21am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “Holy Cow” by David Duchovny

Kate’s 2¢: “Holy Cow” by David Duchovny

“Holy Cow” by David Duchovny
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

As I relaxed and fell into listening to the tale, not the teller, I enjoyed this story even more than “Alice in Wonderland”. I like that it was written with reading it to children in mind, yet, adults will chuckle at the many innuendos and out-right farce in some of the vignettes.
Marsha Rehns did an excellent job of reading life into the characters, enhancing our enjoyment of the tale that has a twist and a deeper meaning that ‘There is no place like home’.

From Wikipedia:
Early life: Duchovny was born in New York, in 1960.[1] He is the son of Margaret “Meg” (née Miller), a school administrator and teacher, and Amram “Ami” Ducovny (1927–2003), a writer and publicist who worked for the American Jewish Committee.[2][3][4] Duchovny’s mother is a Scottish Presbyterian emigrant from Aberdeen, Scotland.[5][6][7] His father was Jewish;[8][9][10] Duchovny’s paternal grandfather was a Jewish emigrant from Berdychiv, Russian Empire (now in Ukraine), and Duchovny’s paternal grandmother was a Jewish emigrant from Russian Poland (now in Poland).[11][12][13][14] His father dropped the h in his last name to avoid the sort of mispronunciations he encountered while serving in the Army.[2][15][16]
Duchovny attended Grace Church School and The Collegiate School For Boys (from which he graduated as head boy in 1978); both are in Manhattan. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa[17] from Princeton University[3] in 1982 with an A.B. summa cum laude in English literature. He was a member of Charter Club, one of the university’s eating clubs. In 1982, his poetry received an honorable mention for a college prize from the Academy of American Poets. The title of his senior thesis was The Schizophrenic Critique of Pure Reason in Beckett’s Early Novels.[18] He played junior varsity basketball at Princeton.[19] He earned a Master of Arts in English Literature from Yale University and subsequently began work on a Ph.D. that remains unfinished.[3] The title of his uncompleted doctoral thesis is Magic and Technology in Contemporary Fiction and Poetry.[20]

From NLS/BARD/LOC:
Holy cow DB81352
Duchovny, David. Reading time: 3 hours, 22 minutes.
Read by Marsha Rehns. A production of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.

Humor

In his debut novel, actor Duchovny tells the story of Elsie, a cow who inadvertently learns about the meat industry and sets off on a globe-spanning adventure with her friends: Jerry, a Torah-reading pig, and Tom, a sophisticated turkey. Some strong language. 2015.

28 Jun 2020, 7:30am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption” and “Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice” by Bryan Stevenson

Kate’s 2¢: “Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption” and “Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice” by Bryan Stevenson

“Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption” and “Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice” by Bryan Stevenson
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

This is a powerful and moving book about a tory most of us know, but, will it motivate us to actually do something about the topic?
One of the many ‘take aways’ I have from reading this book is, perhaps minor, but as the young lawyer was hassled by the pseudo police one midnight, he knew not to run, even though his instinct said to flee. He spoke softly and remained calm. This is a message that everyone needs to remember, especially, people of color.

From the WEB:
Bryan Stevenson (born November 14, 1959) is an American lawyer, social justice activist, founder/executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, and a clinical professor at New York University School of Law. Based in Montgomery, Alabama, Stevenson has challenged bias against the poor and minorities in the criminal justice system, especially children. He has helped achieve United States Supreme Court decisions that prohibit sentencing children under 18 to death or to life imprisonment without parole.[1] Stevenson has assisted in cases that have saved dozens of prisoners from the death penalty, advocated for the poor, and developed community-based reform litigation aimed at improving the administration of criminal justice.
He was depicted in the legal drama Just Mercy which is based on his memoir Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, which tells the story of Walter McMillian.
He initiated the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, which honors the names of each of more than 4,000 African Americans lynched in the 12 states of the South from 1877 to 1950. He argues that the history of slavery and lynchings has influenced the subsequent high rate of death sentences in the South, where it has been disproportionately applied to minorities. A related museum, The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, offers interpretations to show the connection between the post-Reconstruction period of lynchings to the high rate of executions and incarceration of people of color in the United States.
In November 2018, Stevenson received the Benjamin Franklin Award from the American Philosophical Society as a “Drum major for justice and mercy.”[2] This is the most prestigious award the society gives for distinguished public service.

From NLS/BARD/LOC:
Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice DB93365
Stevenson, Bryan. Reading time: 6 hours, 37 minutes.
Read by Bryan Stevenson. A production of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.

Biography
Legal Issues
Young Adult

Founder of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, delves deep into the US justice system, detailing his many challenges and efforts as a lawyer and social advocate, especially on behalf of America’s most marginalized people. Commercial audiobook. For senior high and older readers. 2018.

Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption DB80035
Stevenson, Bryan. Reading time: 11 hours, 6 minutes.
Read by Bryan Stevenson. A production of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.

Legal Issues

Attorney and law professor discusses founding the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need. Describes one of his first cases–defending Walter McMillian, a young man sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. Violence and strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2014.

27 Jun 2020, 6:34am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “Yellowthread Street Books 7-8” by William Leonard Marshall

Kate’s 2¢: “Yellowthread Street Books 7-8” by William Leonard Marshall

“Yellowthread Street Books 7-8” by William Leonard Marshall
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

Alec Volz did a good job of reading these two stories for the NLS. There are some rather gruesome scenes in both pieces, but, one can’t help but be pulled in to the awful truth of what is going on.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Leonard_Marshall
William Marshall (or William Leonard Marshall) (1944-2003) is an Australian author, best known for his Hong Kong-based “Yellowthread Street” mystery novels, some of which were used as the basis for a British TV series. William Marshall worked as a playwright, journalist, proofreader, and morgue attendant and was a teacher in an Irish prison.

From NLS/BARD/LOC:
Yellowthread Street. Books 7-8 DB97572
Marshall, William Leonard. Reading time: 15 hours, 22 minutes.
Read by Alec Volz.

Mystery and Detective Stories

Two mysteries, written in 1981-82. In Perfect End, Chief Inspector Harry Feiffer of the Hong Kong police force and his increasingly competent crew brave a raging typhoon to pursue whoever or whatever has killed six fellow officers, apparently with an electric drill. Also includes War Machine. Strong language. 1982.
Downloaded: June 10, 2020

26 Jun 2020, 8:09am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “The Demmies” by Ann Kathleen Parsons

Kate’s 2¢: “The Demmies” by Ann Kathleen Parsons

“The Demmies” by Ann Kathleen Parsons
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

I read a book excerpt about “The Demmies” in the ‘Magnets and Ladders’ e-magazine in 2017 and have met the author, so I was happy to be able to down-load an accessible copy from BookShare.
It is a long story with, of course, a happy ending for the Demmies. I’d love to have Jeeves at my beck and call, as well as, the YMCA-like field house attached to my home. Alas, it would take up too much from for ‘big people’. It’s just right for the Demmies, who had to put up with horrible conditions while the unscrupleless Dr. did unspeakable experiments on each of the Demmies.
As an Amazon reviewer mentions, this story is loaded with many admonishments about right and wrong, ethical and moral, what is helpful and what is not. It gives one, who has a sense of social justice, a lot of points to ponder.
From https://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons:
About the Author Ann Kathleen Parsons was born in 1953 in Olean, New York. She attended Elmira College, where she received a B.A. in English Education. She continued her studies at St. Bonaventure University, where she received an M.S. in Guidance and Personnel.
From an Amazon reviewer: A reader can enjoy the novel for the story, but the author also weaves in thoughts about having the courage to do what is right, the importance of community, the need for freedom, self-expression, independence, and respect, and the value of giving back to others.

From BookShare:
The Demmies: A Novel
Ann K. Parsons
9781979572460
2017
Literature and Fiction, Parenting and Family, Science Fiction and Fantasy
Synopsis
The demmies were the public’s darlings, but they led a double life. By day, they posed for pictures, were guests on TV shows, and helped to increase knowledge about genetic engineering by taking part in scientific experiments. By night, they faced Dr. Albert Lud’s unauthorized experiments and his torture. Was there something better for the genetically engineered, foot-high humans? Could they escape? If they did, could they find food, shelter, and freedom from the ogre who tormented them? Could they trust any of the “big folk” to help them? These were some of the questions that kept Alex Kenyon awake at night. His daughter Ruth wondered what made a human being. Was it size? Was it intelligence? Was it belief in God? What made her know she was a human being, even though only nine inches tall? This is the story of how Alex’s and Ruth’s questions are answered.

Submitted By:
Evan Reese
Proofread By:
Lissi
Usage Restrictions:
This is a copyrighted book.

23 Jun 2020, 4:46pm
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Cornucopia: Pandemic Moon Beam, double acrostic

Cornucopia: Pandemic Moon Beam, double acrostic

Pandemic Moon Beam, Double Acrostic
By Kate Chamberlin
(Male voice / Female voice)

Panic prevails among the people
Pause to ponder amidst the pale moonlight

Angst, anger, and antagonism abound
Arm in arm with hearts held unbound

Numbness, nausea, and no breath niggle nerves
Nearest to my dearest in the silvery mist

Distance destroys dinners, duties, and dances
Dare to love forever in a moon beam

Electronic exchanges for entertainment and edification
Eternally strolling, stealing passionate kisses

Mindfulness and meditation maintain mental health
Mesmerizing clouds scud across the lunar orb

Incrementally inch by inch, the illness ebbs
Ilk of the virus has been vanquished

Covid-19 be gone; be damned.
Covid-19 survivors linger in the aura of the silvery moon beam.

22 Jun 2020, 4:37am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “The Bright Side of Darkness” by Jo Elizabeth Pinto

Kate’s 2¢: “The Bright Side of Darkness” by Jo Elizabeth Pinto

“The Bright Side of Darkness” by Jo Elizabeth Pinto
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

The Behind Our Eyes writer’s group interviewed Jo Elizabeth Pinto via telephone conference on June 21, 2020. She is a soft spoken mother of a 12-year old daughter and writes in snatches, as she finds time. Her job as a proof reader, precludes her reading and writing a lot of her own pieces.
Her father’s reading to her as a young child was how she got interested in writing and the power of words for a lifetime. Blind parents of sighted children and the issues they face was a large part of the discussion. She shared thoughts about writing and some information about how she accomplishes her work.
She hopes her self-published novel “The Bright Side of Darkness” conveys the message that it is important for adults to mentor young people. Listening is vital.

From the WEB:
J. E. Pinto is a magnet for underdogs! Early in her married life, her home became a hangout for troubled neighborhood kids. This experience lit the flame for her first novel, The Bright Side of Darkness. Pinto’s Spanish-American roots grow deep in the Rocky Mountains, dating back six generations.
She is also the author of “Daddy Won’t Let Mom Drive The Car: True Tales Of Parenting In The Dark”; available through Audible or Amazon.

From BookShare:
The Bright Side Of Darkness, Synopsis
If you’re looking for a well-written story with great, but dysfunctional characters who are struggling through the problems of life together, you’ll love this book! The cast includes several troubled teens, a very cool young blind girl, and adults who for the most part try to do their best to help these kids without much opportunity in life.
Book Details
Book Quality:Excellent
ISBN-13:9781512344943
Publisher:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Date of Addition:03/26/19
Copyrighted By:J. E. Pinto
Adult content:No
Language:English
Has Image Descriptions:No
Categories:
Literature and Fiction Submitted By:Daproim Africa
Proofread By:Daproim Africa
Usage Restrictions:This is a copyrighted book.

21 Jun 2020, 2:09pm
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “The Book of Delights” by Ross Gay

Kate’s 2¢: “The Book of Delights” by Ross Gay

“The Book of Delights” by Ross Gay
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

I down-loaded “The Book of Delights” from BookShare. It took some getting used to listening to the synthesized voice read the almost stream of consciousness until I could discern the wit and thoughtfulness of Ross Gay’s vignettes.

From the website:
“Ross Gay’s eye lands upon wonder at every turn, bolstering my belief in the countless small miracles that surround us.” —Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winner and U.S. Poet Laureate The winner of the NBCC Award for Poetry offers up a spirited collection of short lyric essays, written daily over a tumultuous year, reminding us of the purpose and pleasure of praising, extolling, and celebrating ordinary wonders. Ross Gay’s The Book of Delights is a genre-defying book of essays—some as short as a paragraph; some as long as five pages—that record the small joys that occurred in one year, from birthday to birthday, and that we often overlook in our busy lives. His is a meditation on delight that takes a clear-eyed view of the complexities, even the terrors, in his life, including living in America as a black man; the ecological and psychic violence of our consumer culture; the loss of those he loves. Among Gay’s funny, poetic, philosophical delights: the way Botan Rice Candy wrappers melt in your mouth, the volunteer crossing guard with a pronounced tremor whom he imagines as a kind of boat-woman escorting pedestrians across the River Styx, a friend’s unabashed use of air quotes, pickup basketball games, the silent nod of acknowledgment between black people. And more than any other subject, Gay celebrates the beauty of the natural world—his garden, the flowers in the sidewalk, the birds, the bees, the mushrooms, the trees. This is not a book of how-to or inspiration, though it could be read that way. Fans of Roxane Gay, Maggie Nelson, and Kiese Laymon will revel in Gay’s voice, and his insights. The Book of Delights is about our connection to the world, to each other, and the rewards that come from a life closely observed. Gay’s pieces serve as a powerful and necessary reminder that we can, and should, stake out a space in our lives for delight.

19 Jun 2020, 6:38am
Uncategorized
by

Comments Off on Cornucopia: My Mon, The Artist

Cornucopia: My Mon, The Artist

My Mon, The Artist
One in a series of vignettes about my mom
By Kate Chamberlin

My Mom, Grace Ritch Deyo was the first born child of Grace Udell Ritch and Elting Forsyth Deyo on November 13, 1917.
In high school Mom went steady with a handsome, blonde boy named Foster Whitworth and was voted most popular girl in her class. Apparently, one of her high school art assignments was to draw a self-portrait. The 18”x30” rendering in colored chalk showed her with a slender face, dark brown curly hair, bright dark eyes and extra rosy cheeks. Mom had many spider veins on each cheek, which she highlighted in her self-portrait. Perhaps, as a teenager, her rosy cheeks were embarrassing.
After she was graduated from high school, she enrolled in secretarial school. She stayed for six months and left to accept a secretarial position for DuPont, where her father was employed. While she was in the secretarial pool, she met a handsome young salesman named Paul Hugo Holmberg, and married him on January 13, 1940.
Early in 1967, they moved to Grand Avenue, Balmville, Newburgh, NY when Dupont sold the Newburgh plant to Stauffer Chemical Company. Dad was part of the Management Package that had to move over to the new company. While Dad spent long days at work, my brother was a sales representative for Remington Arms living in C T, and I was teaching Third Grade at Gidney Avenue Memorial School, my at-home Mom, a feisty, fun-loving woman with dark naturally curly hair, filled her days with friends, Gardening, garden Clubs, St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary, and painting in oils.
Our family room of the Balmville home became Mom’s art studio. The big and tall, adjustable wooden easel came from her aunt, Laura Ritch Rouelle, whose paintings are in the Metropolitan Museum. Apparently, the items are somewhere in the bowels of the museum’s storage vault. Mom took painting lessons from John Fleming Gould (b.1906 – d.1996) in his Bethlehem Art Studio for several years, discretely signing her pieces with a lower case ‘grh’ in the bottom right-hand corner. She was always surprised at how well her paintings turned out and delighted in each one. She never had the heart to sell any of her paintings, but she would give them to friends. When my husband and I added a “West Wing” to our Walworth NY home, the long hallway became our gallery. We installed fish-eye ceiling lighting, so we could properly display Mom’s paintings.
The stress of Dad’s work situation and commuting to NYC took its toll on him physically and emotionally. He died during his third heart attack on March 1, 1974. Mom continued to paint until her battle with cancer began in the Fall of 1975. She died peacefully in her Balmville home on May 6, 1976 at the age of 59.
On June 13 2009 my husband, our grandsons Tyler and John, and I drove over the Beacon-Newburgh Bridge to Neil Caplan’s art gallery to donate three of Mom’s oil paintings to the Bannerman Castle Trust Fund. www.BannermanCaastleTrust.org.
The paintings depict scenes of the Hudson River from various Newburgh vantage points. Proceeds from the sale of these paintings will go toward the NY Matching Grant to stabilize, renovate, and reconstruct the unique Bannerman Castle and grounds on the historic, 6.5-acre Pollepel Island, located in the middle of the Hudson River , Mid-Hudson River Valley.
The donated paintings were:
(1) Newburgh’s brick Tenement houses with Bannerman’s Island, 1971. Canvas: 23” tall x 31” wide; framed: 29” tall x 37” wide. Est: $750/Paul Gould.
(2) loosestrife, Bannerman’s Island, Storm King Highway, 1968. canvas: 18” tall x 24” wide; framed: 22” tall x 28” wide. Est: $500/Paul Gould.
(3) Storm King Highway with fall colors, 1968. Canvas: 18” tall x 24” wide; framed: 24” tall x 29” wide. Est: $500/Paul Gould.
During a recent spring cleaning spree, I found a cardboard tube. I thought it was empty, but, when I swirled my finger around the inside, I found the self-portrait Mom had drawn so many years ago. I often wonder if she realized what a rich, wonderful heritage she created for me as she went about doing what she loved to do.

  • Recent Posts

  • Tag Cloud

  • Archived Posts

  • Log in