28 Jun 2020, 7:30am
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Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption” and “Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice” by Bryan Stevenson

Kate’s 2¢: “Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption” and “Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice” by Bryan Stevenson

“Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption” and “Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice” by Bryan Stevenson
Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as, describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

This is a powerful and moving book about a tory most of us know, but, will it motivate us to actually do something about the topic?
One of the many ‘take aways’ I have from reading this book is, perhaps minor, but as the young lawyer was hassled by the pseudo police one midnight, he knew not to run, even though his instinct said to flee. He spoke softly and remained calm. This is a message that everyone needs to remember, especially, people of color.

From the WEB:
Bryan Stevenson (born November 14, 1959) is an American lawyer, social justice activist, founder/executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, and a clinical professor at New York University School of Law. Based in Montgomery, Alabama, Stevenson has challenged bias against the poor and minorities in the criminal justice system, especially children. He has helped achieve United States Supreme Court decisions that prohibit sentencing children under 18 to death or to life imprisonment without parole.[1] Stevenson has assisted in cases that have saved dozens of prisoners from the death penalty, advocated for the poor, and developed community-based reform litigation aimed at improving the administration of criminal justice.
He was depicted in the legal drama Just Mercy which is based on his memoir Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, which tells the story of Walter McMillian.
He initiated the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, which honors the names of each of more than 4,000 African Americans lynched in the 12 states of the South from 1877 to 1950. He argues that the history of slavery and lynchings has influenced the subsequent high rate of death sentences in the South, where it has been disproportionately applied to minorities. A related museum, The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, offers interpretations to show the connection between the post-Reconstruction period of lynchings to the high rate of executions and incarceration of people of color in the United States.
In November 2018, Stevenson received the Benjamin Franklin Award from the American Philosophical Society as a “Drum major for justice and mercy.”[2] This is the most prestigious award the society gives for distinguished public service.

From NLS/BARD/LOC:
Just mercy: (adapted for young adults) : a true story of the fight for justice DB93365
Stevenson, Bryan. Reading time: 6 hours, 37 minutes.
Read by Bryan Stevenson. A production of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.

Biography
Legal Issues
Young Adult

Founder of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, delves deep into the US justice system, detailing his many challenges and efforts as a lawyer and social advocate, especially on behalf of America’s most marginalized people. Commercial audiobook. For senior high and older readers. 2018.

Just mercy: a story of justice and redemption DB80035
Stevenson, Bryan. Reading time: 11 hours, 6 minutes.
Read by Bryan Stevenson. A production of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.

Legal Issues

Attorney and law professor discusses founding the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need. Describes one of his first cases–defending Walter McMillian, a young man sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. Violence and strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2014.

 
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