12 Sep 2019, 4:42am
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Hillman, Laura “I will plant you a lilac tree”

Hillman, Laura “I will plant you a lilac tree: a memoir of a Schindler’s list survivor”

 

Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as,     describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read.  I’m just saying…

 

For decades, I have admired Atheneum Books for Young Readers (NY, London, Toronto & Sydney). “I Will Plant You A Lilac Tree: a memoir of a Schindler’s list survivor” by Laura Hillman   (2005; ISBN 0-689-86980-0) admirably upholds their honored tradition for young readers.

I cannot understand how anyone can deny that the holocaust happened. History has documented the brutality of the Christian Crusades, the Armenian Massacre of 1914, and of course, you know who is currently lopping off heads to mention a few atrocities. I have no doubt of man’s inhumanity to man. The issue is how to prevent such events from ever happening to any group of people.

A huge thank you to Laura Hillman for writing this memoir. I know how writing a memoir opens up so many memories one would rather leave forgotten; however, this is written in language to appeal to teenagers, as well as, adults. I liked the way Lesley LePage read this story and hope to find more books narrated by her. Kudos to her for pronouncing all those foreign words.

 

From NLS/BARD/LOC:

I will plant you a lilac tree: a memoir of a Schindler’s list survivor DBC16342

Hillman, Laura. Reading time: 4 hours, 48 minutes.

Read by Lesley LePage. A production of Wolfner Talking Book and Braille Library.

 

Biography

World History and Affairs

 

Presents the true story of a young girl from a Polish ghetto who was sent to a series of concentration camps and survived the war after being placed on Schindler’s List, finally marrying a fellow survivor. Some descriptions of sex, some strong language, and some violence. For junior and senior high.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Hillman

Laura Hillman (born Hannelore Wolff; October 16, 1923) is a German-born American survivor of Holocaust concentration camps, including Auschwitz-Birkenau.She is also a Schindlerjude, who survived with the help of Oskar Schindler.She is also a writer and memoirist, as well as a lecturer on the Holocaust, and a former docent at the Long Beach Museum of Art.

 

5 Sep 2019, 5:27am
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Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “The Flight Attendant”, “the sleepwalker”, “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands”, “The Water Witches”, “Before You Know Kindness”, “,”The Sandcastle Girls”, “The Night Strangers”, “Secrets of Eden”, and “The Guest Room” by Chris Bohjalian

Kate’s 2¢: “The Flight Attendant”, “the sleepwalker”, “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands”, “The Water Witches”, “Before You Know Kindness”, “,”The Sandcastle Girls”, “The Night Strangers”, “Secrets of Eden”, and “The Guest Room” by Chris Bohjalian

Kate’s 2¢: “The Flight Attendant”, “the sleepwalker”, “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands”, “The Water Witches”, “Before You Know Kindness”, “,”The Sandcastle Girls”, “The Night Strangers”,  “Secrets of Eden”, and “The Guest Room” by Chris Bohjalian

 

Kate’s 2¢: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as,     describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read. I’m just saying…

 

I listened to Jordan Rich’s PODcast “Books In Three Bytes: when he interviewed Chris Bohjalian about his new book “The Flight Attendant”. I read it and then read “the sleepwalker”, “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands”, “The Water Witches”, “Before You Know Kindness”, “,”The Sandcastle Girls”, “The Night Strangers”, and “Secrets of Eden”.

Bohjalian states that although is novels are works of imagination,  He tries to ground his novels in the historical particulars to convey the feel of the time, place, and culture.

While it is true that writers write when they are alone, perhaps in a seemingly vacuum, the acknowledgement list for “The Night Strangers” prove that it really is a group effort.

His technique in several books seems to start with a shocking prologue, then, has the youth narrate the story and, in the epilogue, the adult child wrap up any loose ends.

In ”The Sandcastle Girls”, however, I found the jumping from grown child back to grandparents, to parents, to grandchild a bit confusing. Perhaps, in the print copy, there are little symbols to indicate the back-flash or current time. It is a story full of tragedy, desolation, and man’s inhumanity to man (and woman), but, weaves in an enduring love story  of her Armenian grandfather and Boston bred Grandmother.

I like that “Secrets of Eden” has a study guide at the end of the story, but, be sure to read the story first.

In “The Guest Room”, Bohjalian refers to the Armenian massacre by featuring an Armenian girl forced to be a sex slave. While I thought of a number of other endings for this story, I suppose having the good guy die was better for everyone all around.

I’m going to read more of Chris Bohjalian’s books.

 

 

From WIKIPEDIA:

Chris Bohjalian graduated from Amherst College Summa Cum Laude, where he was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. In the mid-1980s, he worked as an account representative for J. Walter Thompson, an ad agency, in New York.[2] He moved with his wife to Lincoln, Vermont, in 1988.

In Lincoln, Bohjalian began writing weekly columns for local newspaper and magazine about living in the small town, which had a population of about 975 residents. The column ran in the Burlington Free Press from 1992 through 2015 and won a Best Lifestyle Column from the Vermont Press Association. Bohjalian has also written for such magazines as Cosmopolitan, Reader’s Digest, The New York Times, and the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine.

Bohjalian’s first novel, A Killing in the Real World, was released in 1988. His third novel, Past the Bleachers, was released in 1992 and was adapted to a Hallmark Channel television movie in 1995.

In 1998, Bohjalian wrote his fifth book, Midwives, a novel focusing on rural Vermont midwife Sibyl Danforth, who becomes embroiled in a legal battle after one of her patients died following an emergency Caesarean section. The novel was critically acclaimed and was selected by Oprah Winfrey as the October 1998 selection of her Oprah’s Book Club. It became a #1 New York Times and #1 USA Today bestseller. In 2001, the novel was adapted into a Lifetime Movie Network television film starring Sissy Spacek in the lead role. Spacek said the Danforth character appealed to her because “the heart of the story is my character’s inner struggle with self-doubt, the solo road you travel when you have a secret”.

Later career

Bohjalian followed Midwives with the 1999 novel The Law of Similars, about a widower attorney suffering from nameless anxieties who starts dating a woman who practices alternative medicine. The novel was inspired by Bohjalian’s real-life visit to a homeopath in an attempt to cure frequent colds he was catching from his daughter’s day care center. Bohjalian said of the visit, “I don’t think I imagined there was a novel in homeopathy, however, until I met the homeopath and she explained to me the protocols of healing. There was a poetry to the language that a patient doesn’t hear when visiting a conventional doctor.” The protagonist, a father, is based in part on Bohjalian himself, and his four-year-old daughter is based largely on Bohjalian’s daughter, who was three when he was writing the book. Liz Rosenberg of The New York Times said in her review, “Few writers can manipulate a plot with Bohjalian’s grace and power.” But she felt that the novel shared too many similarities with Midwives; Rosenberg said, “Unlike its predecessor, it fails to take advantage of Bohjalian’s great gift for creating thoughtful fiction featuring characters in whom the reader sustains a lively interest.” Megan Harlan of The Boston Phoenix described it as “formulaic fiction” and said Bohjalian focused too much on creating a complex plot and not enough of complex characterizations. The Law of Similars, like Midwives, made the New York Times bestsellers list.

He won the New England Book Award in 2002.

The Double Bind was a Barnes & Noble Recommends Selection in 2007 and debuted at #3 on the “New York Times” bestseller list.

In 2008, Bohjalian released Skeletons at the Feast, a love story set in the last six months of World War II in Poland and Germany. The novel was inspired by an unpublished diary written by German citizen Eva Henatsch from 1920 to 1945. The diary was given to Bohjalian in 1998 by Henatsch’s grandson Gerd Krahn, a friend of Bohjalian, who had a daughter in the same kindergarten class as Bohjalian’s daughter. Bohjalian was particularly fascinated by Henatsch’s account of her family’s trek west ahead of the Soviet Army, but he was not inspired to write a novel from it until 2006, when he read Armageddon: The Battle for Germany, Max Hastings’ history of the final years of World War II. Bohjalian was struck not only by how often Henatsch’s story mirrored real-life experiences, but also the common “moments of idiosyncratic human connection” found in both. Skeletons at the Feast was considered a departure for Bohjalian because it was not only set outside of Vermont, but set in a particular historical moment. The novel was an enormous commercial and critical success: It was Bohjalian’s fifth New York Times bestseller and was selected a “Best Book of the Year” by the “Washington Post” and the “St. Louis Post-Dispatch.” It was also an NBC Today Show “Top Ten” summer pick in 2008.

His 2010 novel, Secrets of Eden, was also a critical success, receiving starred reviews from three of the four trade journals (Booklist, Library Journal, and Publishers Weekly), as well as many newspapers and magazines. It debuted at # 6 on the New York Times and Publishers Weekly bestseller lists. It premiered as a Lifetime Television movie on February 4, 2012, starring John Stamos, Dorsa Giyahi and Anna Gunn. This was the third time one of Bohjalian’s novels was adapted for a movie, following Past the Bleachers in 1995 and Midwives in 2001.

His thirteenth novel, The Night Strangers, was published in 2011. It’s a ghost story and received excellent critical reviews and drew comparisons to the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Atwood, Alice Sebold, Stephen King, and Ira Levin. But reader response was mixed, with some readers frustrated with the ending and Bohjalian’s use of the second person for parts of the narration. The book won the New England Society Book Award for fiction in April 2012.

His The Sandcastle Girls (2012) is about the Armenian Genocide and its century-long denial by Turkey. The novel includes two stories in one: the story of Elizabeth Endicott and Armen Petrosian, lovers who meet in Syria during the genocide; and the story of Laura Petrosian, their granddaughter, who after a century tries to understand why they were so silent about their youth, while her suburban existence is quite different from the violent setting in which her grandparents fell in love. According to USA Today, Bohjalian makes “a near-century-old event come to life in a way that will make readers gasp with shock that such a terrible event — Turkey’s determination to kill all the Armenians in their country — is such a small part of our knowledge of world history”. Oprah Winfrey chose it as a Book of the Week: “This rendering of one of history’s greatest (and least known) tragedies is a nuanced, sophisticated portrayal of what it means not only to endure but also to insist on hope”.

Since then he has written such other New York Times bestsellers as The Light in the Ruins; Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands; The Guest Room; The Sleepwalker; and the forthcoming, The Flight Attendant.

His books have been chosen as Best Books of the Year by the Washington Post, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Hartford Courant, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews, Bookpage, and Salon.

On September 1, 2017, Bohjalian spoke a Vardanants Day Armenian Lecture at the Library of Congress.

Writing style

Bohjalian novels often focus on a specific issue, such as homelessness, animal rights and environmentalism, and tend to be character-driven, revolving around complex and flawed protagonists and secondary characters. Bohjalian uses characteristics from his real life in his writings; in particular, many of his novels take place in fictional Vermont towns, and the names of real New Hampshire towns are often used throughout his stories. Bohjalian said, “Writers can talk with agonizing hubris about finding their voices, but for me, it was in Vermont that I discovered issues, things that matter to me.” His novels also tend to focus on ordinary people facing extraordinarily difficult situations resulting from unforeseen circumstances, often triggered by other parties.

Personal life

Chris Bohjalian was born to an Armenian father and Swedish mother. His Armenian grandparents were survivors of the Armenian Genocide. On October 13, 1984, Bohjalian married Victoria Schaeffer Blewer during a ceremony at the Brick Presbyterian Church in New York City; his brother, Andrew Peter Bohjalian, served as his best man. Chris and Victoria live in Vermont. Their daughter, Grace Experience, is an actor based in Manhattan.[10]

 

From NLS/BARD/LOC:

The flight attendant DB90518

Bohjalian, Chris. Reading time: 11 hours, 40 minutes.

Read by Erin Spencer.

 

Mystery and Detective Stories

 

Binge-drinking flight attendant Cassandra Bowden has the occasional blackout. Waking up in a Dubai hotel room trying to piece together the previous night, she looks at the man she spent the night with. She sees his utter stillness and still wet blood, and begins to lie. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 2018.

 

Before you know kindness DBC05525

Bohjalian, Chris. Reading time: 14 hours, 53 minutes.

Read by Barbara Plude. A production of Connecticut State Library, Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

 

Suspense Fiction

Family

 

At a family reunion in New Hampshire, twelve-year-old Charlotte mistakes her father for a deer while hunting with her uncle’s rifle. Her father’s animal rights activist group brings the divisive issues of gun control and animal rights to the forefront in this spellbinding page-turner. Some violence.

 

Close your eyes, hold hands: a novel DB78965

Bohjalian, Chris. Reading time: 8 hours, 17 minutes.

Read by Grace Blewer.

 

General

 

Living in an igloo of ice and trash bags half a year after a cataclysmic nuclear disaster, Emily is convinced that she will be hated as the daughter of the drunken father who caused the meltdown. She assumes a fictional identity while protecting a homeless boy. Violence, strong language, and descriptions of sex. Commercial audiobook. 2014.

 

The night strangers: a novel DB75918

Bohjalian, Chris. Reading time: 15 hours, 34 minutes.

Read by Erik Sandvold.

 

Supernatural and Horror Fiction

 

After pilot Chip Linton crash lands his plane into Lake Champlain, killing thirty-nine passengers, he, his wife, and their ten-year-old twin daughters escape to a small New Hampshire town. But their Victorian house is haunted, and the town is full of witches, who focus on the twins. Some violence, some strong language, and some explicit descriptions of sex. 2011.

 

The sandcastle girls: a novel DB75215

Bohjalian, Chris. Reading time: 11 hours, 29 minutes.

Read by J. Michael McCullough.

 

Historical Fiction

Family

 

Syria, 1915. American Elizabeth Endicott is helping Armenian refugees from Turkey when she meets Armen Petrosian, whose family has been wiped out by genocide. Years later Armen and Elizabeth’s granddaughter Laura learns of her forebears’ history–and a buried secret. Some violence and some descriptions of sex. 2012.

 

29 Aug 2019, 4:15am
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Comments Off on Kate’s 2¢: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein

Kate’s 2¢: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein

Kate’s 2¢:

“The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein

 

NOTE: There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as,     describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read.

 

I realized that “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein had been on my mind since I’d read it in 2009 or so.

He applied the many facets of writing from fore-shadowing to back-flashes; a heart-warming dog with a personality and a touch of mysticism; the conflict of good and evil; the drama of a love story; the thrilling action of expensive car racing; in-depth character development and plot twists with a conclusion that is totally awesome.

“The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein is a must read just for enjoyment or to parse for its quality of writing.

 

From WIKIPEDIA:

“The Art of Racing in the Rain” is a 2008 novel by American author and film producer Garth Stein — told from a dog’s point of view. The novel became New York Times bestseller, remaining on the list for more than 156 weeks.

The novel follows the story of Denny Swift, a race car driver and customer representative in a high-end Seattle auto dealership, and his dog Enzo, who believes in the Mongolian legend that a dog who is prepared will be reincarnated in his next life as a human. Enzo sets out to prepare, with The Seattle Times calling his journey “a struggle to hone his humanness, to make sense of the good, the bad and the unthinkable.”

Enzo spends most of his days watching and learning from television, gleaning what he can about his owner’s greatest passion, race car driving — and relating it to life. Enzo eventually plays a key role in Denny’s child-custody battle with his in-laws, and distills his observations of the human condition in the mantra “that which you manifest is before you.” Enzo helps Denny throughout his life, through his ups and downs.

Background

Inspiration for the novel came after Stein watched the 1998 Mongolian documentary State of Dogs, and then later in 2004 heard poet Billy Collins give a reading of the poem “The Revenant,” told from a dog’s point of view.

Stein had originally named the dog “Juan Pablo” after Colombian race car driver Juan Pablo Montoya, but changed his name at the suggestion of his wife, naming the dog instead after Enzo Ferrari, founder of the famous Italian automobile marque of the same name.

The race car driving experience of the novel’s character, Denny, is based on Stein’s own experience in racing cars, and on another race car driver who is a close friend of Stein’s who was dealing with some family turbulence at the time. Stein moved from New York City to Seattle in 2001 and became involved in “high performance driver education,] received his racing license with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) and won the points championship in the Northwest region Spec Miata class in 2003. Stein left racing after crashing while racing in the rain.

 

From: NLS/BARD/LOC

The art of racing in the rain: a novel DB66787

Stein, Garth. Reading time: 9 hours, 11 minutes.

Read by Peter Ganim.

Inspirational

Sports Fiction

Family

Animals and Wildlife

Bestsellers

 

Enzo, a mixed-breed dog, believes he will be reincarnated as a human. He stands by his master Denny Swift’s side through Denny’s race-car driving career, the birth of his daughter Zo,︠ ︡the death of his wife Eve, and a bitter custody battle with Eve’s parents. Some strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

 

22 Aug 2019, 12:55pm
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Kate’s 2¢: new blog series

Kate’s 2¢: new blog series

 

I have always enjoyed reading. One of my worries, when I lost my eye sight in 1985, was that I’d never be able to read books, newspapers, or even the junk mail. Technology has come to my rescue and it improves every year.

Not only can I “read” using the Optical Character Recognition (OCR)  scanner, I can access the plethora of printed materials by down-loading articles into my computer. The laptop computer I currently have utilizes NVDA software to “read” what is on the screen. I can, also, access the National Library Services Braille and Recorded Down-loads Library of Congress items  (NLS/BARD/LOC), which I transfer via Humanware Companion to my Victor Stream Reader.

It’s really neat technology and , while it took time and patience for me to learn how to do it  on my own, I can now explore the world and virtually travel everywhere.

   There is a plethora of in-depth biographies of authors and reviews of their books, that state the title, author, published date, and genre; as well as,     describing what the book is about, setting, and character(s), so, Kate’s 2¢ merely shares my thoughts about what I read.

 

14 Jun 2019, 5:57am
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Comments Off on The Walworthians: Knowledge Devise

The Walworthians: Knowledge Devise

The Walworthians

 

A collection of telephone interviews published in the Wayne County STAR Newspaper and Wayne County MAIL Newspaper, 1994-209

by Kate Chamberlin

 

 

~Knowledge Device

July 22, 1998

Announcing the new Built-in Orderly Organized Knowledge device (BOOK).

The BOOK is a revolutionary breakthrough in technology: no wires, no electric circuits, no batteries, nothing to be connected or switched on. It’s so easy to use even a child can operate it. Just lift its cover!

Compact and portable, it can be used anywhere‑even sitting in an armchair by the fire‑yet it is powerful enough to hold as much information as a CD‑ROM disc.

Here’s how it works:

Each BOOK is constructed of sequentially numbered sheets of paper (recyclable), each capable of holding thousands of bits of information. These pages are locked together with a custom-fit device called a binder, which keeps the sheets in their correct sequence.

Opaque Paper Technology (OPT) allows manufacturers to use both sides of the sheet, doubling the information density and cutting costs in half. Experts are divided on the prospects for further increases in information density; for now BOOKS with more information simply use     more pages. This makes them thicker and harder to carry, and has drawn some criticism from the mobile computing crowd.

Each sheet is scanned optically, registering information directly into your brain. A flick of the finger takes you to the next sheet. The BOOK may be taken up at any time and used by merely opening it. The BOOK never crashes and never needs rebooting, though like other display devices, it can become unusable if dropped overboard.

The “browse” feature allows you to move instantly to any sheet, and move forward or backward as you wish. Many come with an “index” feature, which pinpoints the exact location of any selected information for instant retrieval.

An optional “BOOKmark” accessory allows you to open the BOOK to the exact place you left it in a previous session–even if the BOOK has been closed. BOOKmarks fit universal design standards; thus, a single BOOKmark can be used in Books by various manufacturers.

Conversely, numerous bookmarkers can be used in a single BOOK if the user wants to store numerous views at once. Only the number of pages in the BOOK limits the number.

You can also make personal notes next to BOOK text     entries with an optional programming tool, the Portable Erasable Nib Cryptic Intercommunication Language Stylus (PENCILS).

Portable, durable, and affordable, the BOOK is being hailed as the entertainment wave of the future. The BOOK’s appeal seems so certain that thousands of content creators have committed to the platform.

Look for “The Night Search” by Kate Chamberlin and a flood of new titles and authors soon.

2019 Up-date: Joining “The Night Search” are “Charles and David”, “Green Trillium”, and “Behind Our Eyes: A Second Look”.

 

5 Jun 2019, 4:07pm
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The Walworthians: Matt Sass

The Walworthians

 

A collection of telephone interviews published in the Wayne County STAR Newspaper and Wayne County MAIL Newspaper, 1994-209

by Kate Chamberlin

 

Wayne Central Class of ‘91

2019Up-Date:

Matthew T. Sass

Webster: Matthew suddenly passed away on June 1, 2019 at age 45.  He is survived by his wife, Malgorzata Sass; children, Mila and Emmett; parents, Ann and Bernard Sass; mother and father-in-law, Halina and Marian Waliszewski; sisters, Amy Sass, Mary Sass and their families; sister-in-law, Aneta Waliszewski and her family.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Wednesday (June 5), 10:30 AM at St. Mary’s of the Lake Church, 5823 Walworth Rd., Ontario, NY 14519.  Interment in Webster Union Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers, contributions in Matt’s memory may be directed to the Bivona Child Advocacy Center (Bivonacac.org).

Matt was known for his love for his family, friendship, humor and story-telling.  As we celebrate his life, the family welcomes your memories and stories about Matt.  Please visit www.murphyfuneralservices.com to leave the family an online condolence, memory or story, light a digital candle or upload a photo.  This will provide an enduring memory book for the family and all memories and stories, heartfelt to humorous are welcome.

 

Class of ‘91

January 19, 1995 Wayne County STAR Newspaper     After high school graduation, classmates scatter to pursue many endeavors.  Sometimes the closest of ‘buds’ loose touch with each other as their lives diverge.

Many of the Wayne Central Class of ’91 are about to become the collegiate class of ’95.

I dialed the Mother’s Network”  to find out who is doing what:

 

Beth Bradley is a Senior at Nazareth College.  Her double major is English Literature and Philosophy.  She’d like to attend graduate school somewhere in New England.   One of her part-time jobs is working in Victoria’s Secret.  It sounds like she’s getting a well-rounded education!

 

Will Chamberlin is a Senior in the L. C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science at Syracuse University.  He is on the Dean’s List and will be graduated in May, 1995 with a B.S. in Computer Science with Co-Op work experience.  He has stayed active in Volley ball, basket ball and surfing cyberspace. He enjoys living off-campus with 7 housemates and a kitten.

 

Michelle Borkhuis has returned from attending the University of Wollongong, Australia through the University of Massachusetts.  She’ll be graduated in May with a B.S. in Exercise Science.   Michelle found that her experience and work outs with the 8-woman rowing team   at U. Mass. bode her well with all the back-packing, touring and canoeing she did in Australia.  She kept in contact with her parents via E-Mail AFTER returning successfully from her treks.

 

Stephanie Bradford  is doing field work during January for  Keuka College.  She will be graduated in May  with a degree in Hotel/Resort management.  Her  internship experiences have been located in N. Carolina, and portland, Oregon, as well as the Hyatt Downtown

 

Joe Dennie is a Senior at the University of Buffalo.  He’ll be graduated in May with a B.S. in Architecture.   This past summer he worked with his brother and a local contractor framing residential buildings.  Joe found out just how powerful a Power nail driver can be.                               Yes, powerful enough to send a nail through his foot!  He’s OK, but it’s a lesson that won’t have to be pounded into him again.

 

Ian Komorowski   is currently doing a Co-Op block through R.I.T. with the Monroe County Water Treatment Lab.  He lives in Brighten with two other fellows.  He is planning an extended back-packing trip in the spring to tour the U.S.A.  He’s kept in shape by spelunking (cave exploring) on the week-ends.

 

Noel Pollard was also a member of the Class of ’91.  His tragic death took him from us, but, he is not forgotten.

 

MaryKay VanVenschoten is currently working at Bill Grey’s.  She is enjoying being out on her own.  Her future plans might include joining her parents in North Carolina to help with their new restaurant, Speedies Pit Stop.

 

This is just a small sampling.   I’m sure there will be many “official” newspaper notices in the spring.

If you have a Wayne Central or Gananda graduate who you’d like to give a pat on the back, give me a call.  Let’s chat.

 

29 May 2019, 6:07am
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Comments Off on The Walworthians: Ruth L. Miller, obit

The Walworthians: Ruth L. Miller, obit

The Walworthians

 

A collection of telephone interviews published in the Wayne County STAR Newspaper and Wayne County MAIL Newspaper, 1994-209

by Kate Chamberlin

 

2019Up-Date:

WALWORTH: Passed away at her home on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at the age of 97. Ruth was born on February 26, 1922 in Webster, NY to the late Earl E. and Elsie “Semmler” Agne. She was also predeceased by her husband Ralph and brother, Arthur Agne.  Survived by her children, Joyce (Howard) Clark of Palmyra, NY, Beverly Flanigan of Ontario, NY, Leona (Donald) Kirby of Newport, NC, Jean (Donald) Gardner of Ontario, NY and Steve (Nancy) Miller of Ontario, NY; 10 grandchildren; 18 great grandchildren; sister, Virginia Zaso of Ontario, NY; several nieces, nephews and many friends. Ruth had a strong faith and was devoted to her family. Although Ruth received some help from her family, she was able to maintain her independence and lived out her life in her own home. She had a love of flowers and enjoyed gardening through the years. She was loved and will be missed by her family and friends. All are invited to gather for a time of visitation on Friday, May 24, 2019 from 4 to 7PM at the Murphy Funeral & Cremation Chapel, 1040 State Route 31, Macedon, NY 14502 where a celebration of Ruth’s life will take place on Saturday, May 25, 2019 at 11AM.  Interment will follow at Oakwood Cemetery in Penfield. Expressions of sympathy may be made in the form of a donation, in Ruth’s memory, to the Walworth Fire Department, or to the Second Baptist Church of Walworth.  To light a candle, leave a condolence, upload a photo, or order a floral tribute, please visit www.murphyfuneralservices.com.

 

Ruth L. Miller, Grandma

June 19, 1996

Ruth L. Miller is one of the people in our neighborhood.

She grew up in West Brighton and attended   Monroe High School until her parents moved to a farm in Webster.

Ruth met her husband, Ralph, when he hired on as a tenant who helped with the farm work. It must have been true love, because last March 15th they celebrated their 53rd wedding anniversary.

About 40 years ago, they moved to their 21-acre farm on Ontario Center Road. It used to be part of the larger Tabor farm.

It had cherry and pear trees on it, but Ralph wanted to raise pigs, cows and the grain to feed them. The orchard was cut down to make room for his new venture.

Farming didn’t pay all the bills so Ralph delivered feed for Anna B. Youngs’ Feed Mill until he began working at Garlock. His tenure at Garlock lasted over 30 years.

Ruth and Ralph have five children: Joyce Clark, Beverly, Leona Kirby, Jean Gardner and Steve.

“I’ve been real lucky with my kids,” Ruth said proudly. “They never got into any serious trouble while they were growing up in Walworth.”

Each year in the fall, Ruth makes evergreen wreaths to sell at the road side stand next to her driveway. She also puts out pumpkins grown in her back field and sometimes, home-made goodies.

I remember the first time I took my young sons over to let them choose their own pumpkins. We were standing in the yard looking around. We heard a loud putt-putt-chugg before we saw what made the sound.

Ralph was driving an old tractor up the lane from the east field. As he got closer, we noticed something small and white on his lap.

It was Peachy, a little white poodle that went everywhere with him. Ruth said that it was Peachy’s tractor. It didn’t go anywhere without Peachy at the wheel.

Years later, I was standing at the end of Orchard Street listening to the Festival in the Park Parade pass. I heard an old Putt-putt-chug pas and a hearty voice holler, “Hi, Kate. It’s Grandma Miller!”

Peachy had been gone a long time, but his tractor still chugs on. Ruth assured me she’ll be driving it in the parade this year, too.

Thirteen years ago Ruth and I bowled on the same team in the Thursday Morning Women’s League. The enthusiasm she put into bowling is typical of her zest for doing so many things.

She became my Cub Scout Den’s adopted grandmother. We took cookies to her on holidays and sang Christmas carols in her kitchen.

She came to our pack meetings and bid on goodies at the annual Scout Auction.

One year my husband and Grandma Miller vied back and forth on a cake until Dave had to pay almost $20 for it. He surprised her by giving her the cake.

Ruth hasn’t let last year’s mild stroke slow her down. She is warm, friendly and caring with strong feelings and out-spoken thoughts. For example, she feels that the Town Hall has too much unused space in it.

“At first, I thought they were going to put another room or floor in,” she said referring to the large vaulted ceiling of the entrance hall. “And, they said they’d fix up a room for us Senior Citizens to use. That kitchen across the hall from the big room is too dinky for our pot luck suppers!”

I promised Ruth I wouldn’t print the story she told me about a mouse running up her pant leg, so the next time you see her, ask her about it.

Thank you, Ruth Miller. You are a Walworthian with the accent on worth.

 

17 May 2019, 4:46pm
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The Walworthians: Knowledge Device

The Walworthians

 

A collection of telephone interviews published in the Wayne County STAR Newspaper and Wayne County MAIL Newspaper, 1994-209

by Kate Chamberlin

 

 

Knowledge Device

July 22, 1998

 

Announcing the new Built-in Orderly Organized Knowledge device (BOOK).

The BOOK is a revolutionary breakthrough in technology: no wires, no electric circuits, no batteries, nothing to be connected or switched on. It’s so easy to use even a child can operate it. Just lift its cover!

Compact and portable, it can be used anywhere‑even sitting in an armchair by the fire‑yet it is powerful enough to hold as much information as a CD‑ROM disc.

Here’s how it works:

Each BOOK is constructed of sequentially numbered sheets of paper (recyclable), each capable of holding thousands of bits of information. These pages are locked together with a custom-fit device called a binder, which keeps the sheets in their correct sequence.

Opaque Paper Technology (OPT) allows manufacturers to use both sides of the sheet, doubling the information density and cutting costs in half. Experts are divided on the prospects for further increases in information density; for now BOOKS with more information simply use     more pages. This makes them thicker and harder to carry, and has drawn some criticism from the mobile computing crowd.

Each sheet is scanned optically, registering information directly into your brain. A flick of the finger takes you to the next sheet. The BOOK may be taken up at any time and used by merely opening it. The BOOK never crashes and never needs rebooting, though like other display devices, it can become unusable if dropped overboard.

The “browse” feature allows you to move instantly to any sheet, and move forward or backward as you wish. Many come with an “index” feature, which pinpoints the exact location of any selected information for instant retrieval.

An optional “BOOKmark” accessory allows you to open the BOOK to the exact place you left it in a previous session–even if the BOOK has been closed. BOOKmarks fit universal design standards; thus, a single BOOKmark can be used in Books by various manufacturers.

Conversely, numerous bookmarkers can be used in a single BOOK if the user wants to store numerous views at once. Only the number of pages in the BOOK limits the number.

You can also make personal notes next to BOOK text     entries with an optional programming tool, the Portable Erasable Nib Cryptic Intercommunication Language Stylus (PENCILS).

Portable, durable, and affordable, the BOOK is being hailed as the entertainment wave of the future. The BOOK’s appeal seems so certain that thousands of content creators have committed to the platform.

 

Look for “The Night Search”, “Charles and David”, and “Green Trillium” by Kate Chamberlin and a flood of new titles and authors soon.

 

25 Apr 2019, 7:31am
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The Walworthians: Descriptive Voice Service

The Walworthians

 

A collection of telephone interviews published in the Wayne County STAR Newspaper and Wayne County MAIL Newspaper, 1994-209

by Kate Chamberlin

 

Descriptive Voice Service

January 28, 1998

I went to the public library to borrow a video with DVS. DVS is a Descriptive Voice Service that provides a narrator who describes the action.

Some sighted folks find the talking disruptive, but us blind folk find it imperative if we’re going to get anything out of the video.

The DVS videos are marked with braille on the spine and kept in with the regular videos. I ran my fingers over all the tapes, but they were all checked out. You can imagine my disappointment and frustration.

Since my motto is: When life rolls you a lemon, make lemonade, I went over to the books-on-tape section. No braille here, but my husband read the titles to me and I made my selection.

The Talking Books I get through the mail from the National Library for the Blind and Visually Impaired are all marked with braille. It is quick and easy to find tape one/side one, etc.

The commercial tapes aren’t marked with braille, so the first thing I have to do in preparation to listening, is to have a sighted friend check to be sure the tapes are in order with side one up and where the first tape is located in the carton or “book”. And, woe be unto me if I drop the carton and the tapes fall out!

I was pleasantly surprised to find that my current selections have paper (albeit, print) on side one which I could feel. Side two was smooth. This saved me a lot of time and frustration from losing continuity when changing tapes and sides.

The next difference I noticed was when I started to listen to “The Personal History of David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens.

It was like an old radio program! There were horses clopping, knocks on the door, the crackle of a blazing fire and lots of personal characterizations through voice inflections and style.

My first thought was that students listening to this book being read wouldn’t get any literary value out of hearing this. There were no “he said” or she said”; no tag lines. How would the student know what was really written in the book and what was put there by the reader? Forget about spelling!

However, by the end of the first tape I found tears streaming down my cheeks at the funeral of David’s mother and then laughing out loud with the clumsy, good-natured attempts of the cabby to capture David’s nurse maid’s heart.

I found the cockney accent a lot easier to understand when it was spoken rather than if I’d had to read the print. Here the voice inflections emote better than the print could have. Perhaps it is precisely that emotional factor that will keep the story in the student’s mind longer.

The second tape I “read” was Dickens’ Great Expectations. This one was a more accurate reading of the printed text. It included tag lines, descriptions and other mechanics of the printed text. While there were no crackling fires, the reader did excellent voice identification for each character. It was easy to tell who was talking, where they were and a sense of the times.

I suspect listening to classics and other stories on tape will not and should not replace reading the printed or brailled text for yourself if you want to learn about writing mechanics and spelling, but there is no denying the impact of listening to a good book.

Maybe our subconscious is remembering the good feeling of when our Mommy held us on her lap and read to us.

‘“The Personal History of David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens

BBC Radio Presentation, 1994, Bantam, Doubleday, Dell Audio Publishing, NY, NY.

‘”Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens

read by Gene Engene, Books In Motion, Spokan, Washignton,

recording copyright 1990.

2019 Up-Date: I rarely use the library tapes these days. I down-load books and magazines directly from the National Library Service, using the BARD system, then, transfer the down-loads to my Victor Stream Reader. Once I learned how to do it, it’s fast and abosolutely fabulous.

 

18 Apr 2019, 6:51pm
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The Walworthians: Elizabeth M. O’Toole

The Walworthians

 

A collection of telephone interviews published in the Wayne County STAR Newspaper and Wayne County MAIL Newspaper, 1994-209

by Kate Chamberlin

 

Elizabeth M. O’Toole

April 30, 1997

 

Elizabeth M. O’Toole is one of the people in our neighborhood. She is the newest Children’s Librarian at the Walworth-Seely Library.

“I’m in seventh heaven,” Liz said during our telephone interview. “I love doing the bulletin boards, crafts, stories and being with the children.”

If Liz is in the “children’s room” when the clerks leave in the afternoon, they know something special is in store for everyone in the morning!

“Liz creates such an exciting ambiance that it’s infectious,” said one of the clerks.

Liz has been working at the library ever since her friend Mary Perry, then head librarian, mentioned they needed another clerk. Liz applied and got the job. When the opening came for a children’s librarian, she was a natural shoo-in and hasn’t been sorry yet.

She has a degree in Early Childhood Education. She taught in the Cleveland area for a year and is applying that Montessori training to her library program. Liz would like to continue the current programs of Book Jammers for the 4th through 6th graders and the Story Hours for the Preschoolers.

She’s beginning a K-2 Program to encourage more library use. The children will be reading about such things as kites and pin-wheels. Then, they’ll make what they’ve read about to take home.

She’s been practicing on her own children for years! Kimberly is 13, an active Girl Scout and will be attending Our Lady of Mercy. She’d like to become “some kind of doctor”.

Tom, is 10, a Boy Scout in Troop 260 and active in sports. I met Tom several years ago when I did a Guide Dog Puppy program for the Book Jammers. He is friendly, out spoken and a real nice guy.

Colleen is 7 years old, an active Brownie and attending St. Joseph’s School in Penfield. She is fascinated with all kinds of “creatures”.

Caitlyn is 4 and attending Wee People Nursery School in Walworth and looking forward to attending kindergarten at St. Joseph’s in September.

The kids share their home with G-man, a one year old Golden Retriever, and Emmy Lou, a 7 year old Yellow Lab.

Last, but not least, (or should I say: first and foremost) is Liz’s husband John. He is an ex-Navy man who moved his family to the Walworth area 8-1/2 years ago when he came to work on the Gannett Nuclear Power Plant.

Liz met John when she was in college. She and several girlfriends decided it would be exciting to go into Milton to a tavern. It just happened to be the same tavern that was popular with the off duty Navy men from the nearby shipyard. Need I say more?

John is active in the Walworth Volunteer Fire Department and was a Den Leader for Tom’s den.

This summer, Liz is initiating a program for young adults in grades 6 through 8. The theme is On The Wild Side.

I know the cartoonist who is coming to do her thing on July 30 from 11 to Noon and she is definitely on the wild side!

“I like living in Walworth,” Liz said. “Gananda is kid oriented. I feel the children and I are safe. People in general are friendly and there are lots of baby-sitters available during the day.”

“I’d like to see the new Y come to our area,” Liz said. “If a kid isn’t sports oriented, there isn’t much for them to do.”

I suspect Liz is going to do her part to provide more for these children by and through her work at the library.

Thank you, Liz. You are a Walworthian with the accent on WORTH.

2019 Up-Date: none

 

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